Easy Life’s “Junk Food” redefines good music taste

Emily Hoang, Staff Writer

Craving new music? Easy Life delivers on their latest mixtape “Junk Food” with seven songs that tackle the complexity of unhealthy lifestyles under the unexpected guise of dynamic tones, expressive lyrics, and upbeat melodies. Even though most of their music would be dominantly associated with the indie-pop genre, as Easy Life builds their discography and define themselves as artists in the ever-changing and ever-growing music sphere, they have been intentionally pushing the boundaries of genre with their diversified sound that draws influences from jazz, funk, soul, hip-hop, and electronic music. 

Following their transcendental “Spaceships Mixtape” released last year, Easy Life switches the pace this time around with concepts and storylines that are more down-to-earth. Their songs confront the mundane realities of being a human with tracks like “Spiders,” which deals with the desperate feelings that rise after a break-up, and “Dead Celebrities,” which deals with the perception of extravagant lifestyles in Hollywood. 

Although each song is not evidently linked into the concept of “junk food,” each song has its own rhythmic flavor and aroma that help to illustrate unique situations. If the first track “7 Magpies” were a junk food, it would be a piece of bubble gum. It has a child-like nostalgic tone as it includes a twist on a classic children’s nursery rhyme, but also has an overall melancholic tone because it describes a situation where feelings are kept hidden. 

The next track, “Nice Guys,” is more like a bottle of Coca-Cola. There’s a confident comparison between nice guys that come last but are nothing in comparison to him, the song has a really classic character that is reinforced with an animated, carefree spirit. “Sangria,” meanwhile, feels like a bag of Flamin Hot Cheetos. It has an electric and soulful feel as it describes how elaborate and complicated an undefined relationship can be. 

If “LS6” were a junk food, it’d be cotton candy. The underlying concept of “LS6” is an overall feeling of being out of control but remains soft and sweet as the music dissolves into itself. “Earth” is the musical equivalent of a gooey chocolate bar that oozes sticky caramel, as it addresses a relationship between two very different people who are aware their time together is limited. Last, but not least, “Spiders” is like rock candy that will rot your teeth with its sickly sweet notes and unavoidable, unanswerable questions about what to do when someone you were used to having around is now gone. 

As a whole, the “Junk Food” mixtape not only breaks genres, but also unpacks unanticipated detrimental inclinations and indulgences that come with growing as a person and grappling with inherent cravings for satisfaction. “Junk Food” might not be good for everyone so indulge wisely, but at least “Junk Food” isn’t “Yummy.”