There can be no such thing as a hateful Christian

Carly Matthews, Staff Writer

Alyssa Beccue

This article shouldn’t need to be written, but unfortunately there are many Christians who still marginalize people and do not see their actions as hateful. Whether it’s homophobia, xenophobia, marginalizing pro-choice advocates, or ostrasizing people from another political party, many Christians have developed an image of being a people who harbor hatred in their hearts by judging and excluding others. 

Simply put, if your definition of Christianity includes hatred or isolation towards a certain group, it’s not Christianity. Many use the Bible to justify hate, especially towards the LGBTQ+ community, and while there are several verses that can be interpreted that way, there are several hundred verses talking about loving and accepting one another. Believing that Jesus Christ is your savior means following his example. By excluding and marginalizing people, we show that we do not have faith that God will judge people justly and take it upon ourselves to do so.

In Matthew 5:44, Jesus tells us to “love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you.” This is very clear: don’t hate people. Yes, this passage makes it clear that there are enemies of Christians and Christianity. There are people in the world who will try to attack our faith and pull us away from Christ. However, this does not matter. It doesn’t matter if we think that some people are our enemies, or that they are spreading evil in the world. As humans living in a fallen world, we are also evil and sin against God daily. We are still called to love everyone. It is not our place to judge people or force our ideology down their throats because we cannot change their minds. All we can do is be a Christlike example to them and let God work in them. If God means to punish them, we need to trust that he will do so; if he means to change their hearts he will. Our job is to welcome them, to engage them in community, to love them and to reflect Christ in our actions towards them. 

Many Christians justify their hate by saying that they are telling people the error of their ways so that they can be saved. On the surface this looks like a good argument, but when has anyone ever changed their opinion after someone yells at them for it? When has telling people that they are evil ever worked in making them good? We show people the error of their ways by showing them what goodness looks like, by welcoming and loving them, not by telling them that they are going to hell.

As Christians we need to practice patience and love towards everyone, especially our enemies. If we hate them or harm them, we are simply taking our place among the sinners. Romans 12:15 says, “Do not take revenge, my dear friends, but leave room for God’s wrath.” It is God’s place alone to punish people for their actions or lack of faith, not ours. 

The Bible explicitly tells us to love our enemies and to not hurt them. If we take it upon ourselves to judge people, to hate them for their actions and decisions, we are showing that we do not trust God to do it. We are telling God that we think we know better than Him, that our worldly judgement is superior to His omnipotence. Christianity is about trusting God and love people. Hating people in any way goes against the core beliefs of our faith.